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“PINK GLASSES (ALL THE COLORS)” by Thomas Osatchoff
ISSUE 6: WINTER 2017 / POETRY

“PINK GLASSES (ALL THE COLORS)” by Thomas Osatchoff

Usually we think of things how they seem. We’re elastic bands though we may seem
like human beings.
I like licking the white plastic torn pure from the top of white yogurt containers—
vanilla. Millions of live bacteria trying to see her
in Manila without color and without eyes
help to maintain my bodily balance.

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WHO IS LUKA FISHER?
INTERVIEWS / ISSUE 6: WINTER 2017

WHO IS LUKA FISHER?

BY ANNA UREÑA

Luka Fisher has been an unofficial patron of the arts for DRYLAND since its inception in 2015. I don’t know how she heard about us back then but I liked the work she sent us and published her short films and multimedia pieces. After that, we were showcasing photographers, filmmakers, performance artists, and poets like Gina Canavan, Kayla Tange, Matthew Kaundart, Chelsea Bayouth, Leila Jarma, and Mike Leisz—artists who were all tracing back to Luka Fisher. After a non-investigation into who she was (I don’t lurk, I’m oldschool like that), it was clear that this would one day require a meet up.

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“FAUX FABLE: GOING PRIMITIVE” by William C. Blome
FICTION / ISSUE 6: WINTER 2017

“FAUX FABLE: GOING PRIMITIVE” by William C. Blome

Flexing her biceps again and again until she actually grew a tad woozy from doing so, Pearl nevertheless kept feeling her left arm with her right fingers (and vice versa, of course) over and over, until one day, she skipped through her living room and on into the powder room with its mirror and visual confirmation that if she craved to bulk up and grow strong enough to truly go Cro-Magnon, then she was going to have to become sufficiently buff to be able to club her lover on his fedora-wearing head so he’d drop like a deflated judy-doll, and it would then be okay for Pearl to lose her thick, thick club of oak and drag her lover to the daybed in her duplex— well, in order for Pearl to accomplish all that, she was going to have to polish off even more than her standard fare of four nice bowls of steel-cut oatmeal every morning, an overstuffed hero sandwich near noon, and a sixteen-ounce rare porterhouse with Jujubes come dinnertime.
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