THE LAND CALLS TO US: A Word Against Gentrification
ESSAYS

THE LAND CALLS TO US: A Word Against Gentrification

BY DEMITRI ADDERLEY

I’ve always thought that the idea to pay to live on Mother Earth was one of humanity’s greatest crimes against itself. Clearly a supremacist philosophy– controlling grids, metering energy, suppressing fact, and dispensing taxes. These gentrifiers are dangerous! Buying communities out of their own land…foreign invaders from the shadowlands of the capitalist regime. Snaking deals from the pockets of Babylon merchants – leveraging your land, your children’s future over the strength of a failing dollar. Continue reading

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The Confessions of an Unconstructed Film Reviewer
ESSAYS

The Confessions of an Unconstructed Film Reviewer

BY STEVEN GRAY

I write reviews of films for people who have already seen them, and to let others know a certain film exists, however foreign, old, obscure, or obtuse.

I use a movie as a starting point and free-associate myself into an essay.

I come up with a five or six-page meditation on the automatic sin machine of cinema.

I may give away the plot or not, while questioning the mass psychology of entertainment. Continue reading

ALBUM REVIEW: Sahtyre ‘Cassidy Howell’
ALBUM REVIEWS / MUSIC

ALBUM REVIEW: Sahtyre ‘Cassidy Howell’

REVIEWED BY DEMITRI ADDERLEY

The human voice has marched soldiers onto the battlefield, separated men from the money in their pockets, and has stripped strangers of their underwear. Rap music is the genre of the voice: one voice, one mic. The genre where one voice can literally build a nation. The thought that rap music is a lesser art form is one that my generation (you probably call us millennials, I call us Humanity’s Last Hope) will permanently abolish.

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‘SLEEP CYCLE’ Segments from the Art-Experience at CalArts
ART SHOWS / LOS ANGELES EVENTS

‘SLEEP CYCLE’ Segments from the Art-Experience at CalArts

WRITTEN BY ARTIST LUKA FISHER

The audience laughed at Tristene Roman’s comical nihilistic cut up poems and cried more than once. First, with Daniel Crook’s harrowing songs about being queer in small town america and then with Sarah Gail Armstrong’s accounts of the casual racism and systematic oppression that she and other black women are forced to deal with on a daily basis. The audience then danced to electronic death metal and covered each other in paint after performance artist Kayla Tange arrived.

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‘FIGHT IN HEELS’ Hear The Call…SNAAATCH!
FILM REVIEWS

‘FIGHT IN HEELS’ Hear The Call…SNAAATCH!

BY DEMITRI ADDERLEY

The central and compelling theme of FIGHT IN HEELS is the reawakening of the warrior spirit in womankind. So much of modern femininity is wrapped up in primping and accessorizing, makeup tutorials, and sex tips from magazines. Women are encouraged to be docile and soft, even to their own detriment. This film eviscerates that pathos; “You can’t fight in high heels…SNAAAAATCH.”

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“Miscasting, Propaganda, and Psychologically Twisted Violence: A Look at Disturbing Films”
FILM REVIEWS

“Miscasting, Propaganda, and Psychologically Twisted Violence: A Look at Disturbing Films”

BY STEVEN GRAY

My parents didn’t own a television until I was twelve and they limited our viewing time. My mother would say: “You should learn how to entertain yourself.” I didn’t have that many channels but I also didn’t have commercials so it wasn’t bad advice; however, it left me vulnerable whenever I was exposed to someone else’s television. I wasn’t used to how coldblooded it was. I was haunted for months by a TV show I saw at my grandmother’s house: two young men were confronted by a street gang in the 1950s; one ran away, but his friend was beaten to death. When you’re five or six years old that is hard to process.

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“Cue Sticks & Chicken Grease” — Crawfords In Filipinotown
Food Reviews

“Cue Sticks & Chicken Grease” — Crawfords In Filipinotown

REVIEWED BY ANNA UREÑA AND NIKOLAI GARCIA

Not quite a dive bar, and not quite a chicken shack, Crawfords sits on Beverly boulevard, with its door wide open, welcoming anybody who walks by. We went in, with no expectations, checking out the place to see what was on the menu. We noticed that were no seats available so then we started heading toward the door when Nikolai spotted some empty tables at the far corner of the bar near the pool table.
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Leaving the USA to a Mexico They’ve Never Known: Stories of Deportation
ESSAYS / NEWS

Leaving the USA to a Mexico They’ve Never Known: Stories of Deportation

BY MARÍA CRISTINA HALL

For decades, communities of undocumented immigrants have been shrouded in poverty and institutional neglect. Their migratory status—sometimes an imposed condition, as is the case with children brought to the United States—condemns immigrants to a life in the shadows.

In this interview at the University Tecnologico de Monterrey in Mexico City, deported persons shared what it’s like to have to leave the country, what it’s like to be recruited in a gang, and what it’s like to adapt to Mexico having lived an entire life in the USA. They shared their stories and the stories of their mothers, sisters, and friends back home. Please give it a listen.

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SEX AND DEATH AND BAD TRANSLATIONS
ESSAYS / FILM REVIEWS

SEX AND DEATH AND BAD TRANSLATIONS

BY STEVEN GRAY

There used to be a video rental store in San Francisco which specialized in Japanese films. This was in the 1980s. I wandered in one afternoon, not planning on renting any tapes but curious what they had. In the back was a section for X-rated films. I started reading the titles and descriptions since the translations were so demented. In going from Japanese to English the words passed through a warp which left them scrambled.

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